How to Cut Drip Edge Corners

Nowadays, almost every house owner installs a drip edge on the roof to protect the roof and other components from water.

To install a drip edge on your roof, you need to know how to cut drip edge corners. Most of the drip edges are made of metal, vinyl or aluminum.

Metal drip edges are usually non-staining, which creates a great appearance to the exterior of your house. It also makes your roof more stable. Get your tin snips ready and find out how to cut drip edge corners in this article.

how to cut drip edge corners

If you don’t install a drip edge on your roof, it will probably cause the fascia to get damaged over time.

The water will stain the walls, and the damage can get to the interior of the house. It is the long-term effect.

If you live in an area where it rains heavily, installing a drip edge is crucial for you. The drip edge lets the water flow from the roof directly instead of flowing in random directions down the house, causing damage to the fascia.

In most houses, there is usually a gap between the fascia and the decking. Small insects or animals can enter your home through that gap.

When you install a drip edge, it will fill in that space.

One of the main reasons for a damaged roof is that the roof’s fascia absorbs water and causes damage in the long run.

How to Cut Drip Edge Corners

If you install a drip edge, it will increase the lifetime of the roof. It would be best if you also cut drip edge corners properly, which will match the roof.

Cutting the drip edge corners properly will help you install it on your roof accurately.

Below, there is a step-by-step guide that will help you to cut drip edge corners successfully.

Step 1: Start working from one corner of the roof

You will need to start nailing the drip edge from one corner of the roof. Then, you will need to set the drip edge in such a way that water doesn’t drain on the overlap.

Try to overlap on the sloped edges. You will need to nail the drip edge properly. You can use a hammer to nail the drip edge.

Keep a distance of around 2 feet between each nail and do it for all corners of the roof.

Step 2: With the help of tin snips, prepare to cut the four corners of the roof

You will need tin snips to cut the corners of the drip edge. If you often work on projects around the home, you will find that a tin snip comes quite handy. They’re available online and from any hardware store.

Step 3: Make a first cut at the top of the profile

To cut a drip edge for a 90-degree bend, you will need to make a total of 2 cuts to allow the corners of the drip edge to bend and make an angle.

With a tin snip, cut a straight line through the bend’s middle, at the top of the drip edge profile.

Step 5: Make a second cut at the bottom edge

Then, in the front of the drip edge profile, make sure it’s a line straight across from the one you’ve cut on the top.

Make a cut at just the bottom hem. That’s a straight cut to the first visible bend line.

Now, you can make a straight bend, like a 90-degree bend.

Step 4: For a better overlap, remove a wedge from the cut of the top profile

This next step will give you space for the bend and create a better overlap.

For this detail, you will cut an angle off the top profile cut. Pull off the triangle piece.

You can then nail down the top profile when it’s bent on a 90-degree corner.

You can use a hammer and nails or a coil roofing nailer for quick installation.

Following these steps mentioned above, you can successfully cut drip edge corners. Most of the drip edges come in the shape of L or a 90-degree bend.

After cutting the drip edge, you will need to install it properly with drip edge nails and a roofing nailer.

The main purpose of installing a drip edge is to direct water into the gutter without touching the fascia.

Do you need a drip edge on gable ends?

Almost every type of roof needs a drip edge these days. If your house has a gable end roof, you will probably want to install a drip edge as well.

You can choose a “T” shaped drip edge, which are made for gable end roofs. Many residential roofs include drip edges, but older homes may not come with one.

Houses that don’t come with drip edges are recommended to have them installed.

You will need to install a drip edge on your roof to increase the lifespan of your roof. If you install a drip edge, it will prevent rainwater and snow from staining the walls.

Your roof will look newer longer. Drip edges come in handy during snow and rain. If you don’t install a drip edge, the fascia and decking could get severe damage over time.

It is one of the common causes of leakage in the house.

You might be worried about the appearance of your house. You might be thinking about how the exterior of your house will look if you install a drip edge.

Nowadays, drip edges come in different colors and sizes. Most of the drip edges come in an “L” shape. But there are other shapes available as well.

For gable ends roofs, “T” shaped drip edges are the more suitable ones.

Also, the drip edges come in different colors to match the color of your home exterior.

Now, you’ve found out the reasons why installing a drip edge to the roof has become a building code for most residential areas across North America. It helps protect the home from water damage.

How to Cut Outside Corner Trims
How to Attach a Patio Roof to an Existing House

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